Washington DC Solar, solar renewable Energy,
Written by Lisa Walsh

Washington DC Solar Owners and Selling Solar RECs Upfront

Solar Service ,Home Solar Panels

Before we dive into this conversation – let’s be clear that SRECs (Solar Renewable Energy Credits) can be the most confusing part of figuring out the economics of a solar project.  Let’s also be clear that – as with anything confusing, (as well as possibly boring) – the temptation is to remove the confusion as quickly as possible.   In the world of solar installation and selling SRECs this sometimes translates to simply selling up to 15yrs of SRECs all at once to a solar installation company, who then installs the system at a bargain price.  Buyer beware – the immediate gratification of selling all of your SRECs in one fell swoop could be misleading.   When it comes to How and When you get paid for your SRECs “…the Sooner the Better”  may not be a sound financial strategy.

That said…Let’s talk Solar Renewable Energy Credits in Washington DC.

Both Maryland and Washington DC, along with eight other states have enacted the Renewable Portfolio Standards which specify that a certain amount of the renewable energy generated within that state must come from solar.   Whether residential, commercial, or institutional, each time a solar system generates 1 Megawatt hour of energy – the solar system owner generates 1 SREC.  This SREC is then sold via aggregators to an  SREC market where it is bought by Power Companies to allow them to meet their share of the compliance obligation, or else pay a legislated fine (Alternative Compliance Payment, or ACP) for every SREC they are short.  Washington DC currently generates the highest SREC values in the country largely due to the fact that the District does not have the real estate to install large solar farms which can oversupply the market and drive down SREC prices.

How Much is an SREC worth?

The value of an SREC in a particular market is dynamic due to two primary factors

  1. by design, SRECs values are intended  to decline over time.  The legislated ACP which serves as a ceiling to the SREC price is usually scheduled to decline in future years. Among other factors, increased installations should lead to decreased system costs and less need for SRECs to help finance a solar system.
  2. The other reason for variations is due to market mechanisms.  Brokers buy and sell SRECs in order to help make a market for them.  When the market is undersupplied, SRECs trade high, at a price close to the penalty (ACP).  This is good for those selling SRECs.  If the market is oversupplied (like Maryland is currently), then SREC prices in that market will decline well below the penalty – not so good for those selling SRECs. Varying SREC payment options are intended to allow system owners to buy down their SREC price risk. The difference between an Upfront Payment option and a Brokerage Payment option (market price) can be many thousands of dollars to a solar system owner.  In an undersupplied market like DC, where there is very little price risk for SRECs, that upfront payment option leaves a lot of money on the table.

How many SRECs will my system generate?

The number of SRECs any given system will generate depends upon the output of your system.  For example, an optimized (as in good and sunny) 5.0 kW system in Washington DC would generate close to 6.0 SRECs/year.

How and When would I receive my SREC income?

SRECs are most commonly sold through an SREC aggregator/broker such as Washington DC-based SolSystems.  However, SRECs here in the District are so valuable – as well as stable – that solar panel contractors are also offering to buy your SRECs and simply deduct the upfront payment off the cost of your solar installation.  So THIS is the heart of this article:  Solar owners have 3 choices for how to get paid for their SRECs:

  1. Upfront Payment (all SRECs are forfeited for a 5yr or 15yr period)
  2. 3yr, 7yr or 10yr Annuity Contract (SREC prices Locked-in for a specific term)
  3. Brokerage (Current market price less broker commission).

Sticking with the aforementioned 5kW system example, the following table illustrates projected SREC values for the system, using current SREC prices (November 2016) offered by a competitive SREC aggregator).

System Size = 5kW                            SREC per Year = 6

So, reviewing the column above, this Washington DC Homeowner with a 5.0kW system has these financial options to choose from:

$$$$$:  Brokerage = $32,101.85 over 25yr life of systems (as warrantied)

$$$:  *Annuity =  $18,690 guaranteed then sign-up for another annuity or go Brokerage

$:  Upfront = $8025.60  SRECs cannot be sold again until 2032.

*Annuity is also available in 3 or 5 yr increments, as well as the 10yr

The Brokerage price is exponentially higher than the other prices, does that mean there’s a lot of risk?

Some risk – yes, because you’re not locked-in to a static price.   But remember – historically DC SREC pricing has remained stable (the geography does not accommodate  huge solar farms that can flood the DC SREC market).  You can receive an email monthly that allows you to check on current pricing AND should the price start to decline – you can, at any point in time, switch to an Annuity.  .

If I choose the 10yr Annuity Option and lock-in my SREC pricing, what happens at the end of that time period?

You simply choose another payment option being offered at the time of contract experation.  Maybe you’ll opt for brokerage – or another annuity, up to you.  Same with the Upfront Payment, after 15 years.

How do I receive my SREC income?

Via check from the SREC aggregator which most pay quarterly (except with the Upfront Payment option which would be one-time).   This generally starts around two months after your system has been interconnected by your Utility and the SREC contract set-up.   We do advise that the contractual SREC relationship be kept between a professional broker/aggregator and the solar system owner.  Third parties, such as the solar panel installation company, may find themselves in a conflict of interest.

If the solar system installer is not buying my SRECs, who sets up the contract?

Most reputable solar panel installation companies will coordinate the initial set-up of your SREC contract with an SREC aggregator, as they have immediate access to the documents required for the initial set-up (Passed Building Permit, Interconnection Approval etc.).  Many installers have one or two aggregators they’re used to dealing with – or you may choose your own.

Washington DC Solar Commercial Solar Service
Written by Rick Peters

Commercial Solar Water Heating: ANOTHER Renaissance?

Washington DC Solar ,Commercial Solar ServiceSolar water heating has quite a long history. In the United States alone, the industry has boomed and busted 3 times in the last 130 years – each time displaced by cheap energy. Many are surprised to know that the first US patent for a residential solar water heater was issued in 1891 to Clarence Kemp, a Baltimore inventor. That’s right, 1891.  In the 1920’s, 30% of the homes in Pasadena, CA had solar water heaters.  With the discovery of natural gas resources in the region, the industry evaporated almost overnight.  Solar thermal technology is mature and efficient; the problem lies with allowing our commitment to solar to dissolve in favor of decreasing natural gas prices.

In these previous industry “busts”, energy became cheap and we were lulled into a false expectation of stable prices. Each time, not long after the industry was dismantled, energy prices began to creep back up, making us long for that clean and cheap solar energy again. So today Solar Water Heating is on the rise again. Will it be different in the 21st century or are we doomed to repeat the same cycle? What was it that Winston Churchill said about failing to learn from history….?

The recent surge in US solar water heating deployments began in 2008. This resurgence, especially at the commercial scale, has helped to drive up adoption rates while scaling down installation costs. Several factors are converging in recent years to bring about this renaissance:

  • Engineers, architects, and contractors are becoming increasingly familiar with this mature technology – improving costs with increasing experience
  • Regional incentives are bolstering the existing federal incentives to reduce the capital investment.
  • The federal government has mandated that a minimum of 30% of water heating must come from solar for new construction or major renovations on federal buildings.
  • Project Developers like Skyline Innovations (http://www.nextility.com/) have introduced new business models to help deploy these systems for those without available capital.
  • Property owners increasingly want to have more control over their energy budget
  • Various societal pressures continue to reward solar adoption
  • An improving economy has allowed property owners finally to reinvest in their buildings

Remarkably, much of this has occurred despite a backdrop of rapidly falling natural gas prices (the primary heating fuel for commercial water heating), decreasing drastically from 2008 to 2012. However, in the last 18 months, natural gas prices are climbing again in a trend that is likely to continue: gas exportation; deployment of energy intensive manufacturing in the US; diversion of more natural gas to transportation (locomotives, trucks, fleet vehicles and eventually automobiles); conversion of more power plants and residential heating to natural gas.In light of these trends, property owners are rapidly moving forward to install solar water heating systems before the financial incentives expire. Business owners with substantial hot water loads in Washington DC and Maryland are able to achieve simple ROIs of 2-7 years. This approach requires them to take a slightly longer perspective, recognizing that they are buying 30+ years of energy up front for a fixed price (with generous subsidies). Whether financed independently or through the bank, building owners are able to lock in their energy prices and hedge the inevitable increase in fuel costs while leveraging all of the other benefits of renewable energy.

If you have any doubts about this trend, visit our commercial solar water heating page and take a look at the photos of just a subset of the projects we’ve been deploying in the region (https://solarsaves.net/commercial-solar-water-heating/).

If you want to know more about the history of solar water heating, check out this excellent book: The Golden Thread: 2500 Years of Solar Architecture and Technology, coauthored by Ken Butti and John Perlin.

Residential Solar Panels ,Solar Service, Home Solar Panels
Written by Anonymous

DC Condos Use Solar Energy to Pre-Heat Hot Water

Residential Solar Panels ,Solar Service ,Home Solar PanelsWASHINGTON, DC:  Solar Energy Services, Inc., in partnership with third party solar developer Skyline Innovations, recently finished the installation of a solar water heating system for Shoreham North, a condominium building in downtown Washington, DC.

The solar thermal system includes 26 collectors southerly mounted on the roof, closed-loop plumbed to a 1,500 gallon solar storage tank inside the building.  The system is expected to reduce the building’s water heating utility bill by about 30%.

Written by Anonymous

George Washington University to Install Solar Water Heaters

WASHINGTON, DC:  Solar Energy Services, Inc. of Millersville, MD has been contracted by Skyline Innovations, Inc., a Washington, DC third-party solar developer, to install two solar water heating systems at the George Washington University campus in downtown DC.

The systems include a ballasted 30-panel evacuated tube system on the flat rooftop of one dormitory and a similar 60-panel system on the flat rooftop of another dormitory. The 30-panel system design will utilize an existing 2,500 gallon storage tank in the penthouse for solar storage, while the 60-panel system design utilizes an existing 2,500 gallon tank in the basement mechanical room.

Click HERE for post-installation pics